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Headaches

Cervicogenic Headache

A cervicogenic headache is defined as a one-sided headache originating from the cervical region. The headache is usually brought about by neck movement or by local pressure over tender spots in the cervical region.

 

What are some symptoms of a cervicogenic headache?

Differentiating between cervicogenic headache and other forms of headache may be difficult secondary to variability in presentation and considerable symptom overlap. Pain is usually localized to the neck and occipital region and can radiate to the forehead, orbital region, temples, or ear and is precipitated or aggravated by neck movement or sustained neck posture. Diagnostic injections have a role in not only differentiating different types of headaches, but also identifying the pain generator. Diagnostic injections of the cervical facet joints (or medial branch blocks), blocks of the cervical nerves, cervical discography, sphenopalatine and sympathetic blocks often times will elucidate the source of pain.

 

Occipital Headache

An occipital headache is usually defined as a sudden jabbing pain in the distribution of the greater or lesser occipital nerves. There is often accompanied by diminished sensation or tingling in the affected area.

 

What are some symptoms of an occipital headache?

Differentiating between occipital headache and other forms of headache may be difficult secondary to variability in presentation and considerable symptom overlap. Pain is usually localized in the distribution of the greater or lesser occipital nerves. The affected nerve is tender to palpation. Diagnostic injections have a role in not only differentiating different types of headaches, but also identifying the pain generator.